Mind Over Mood - The Book

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Book Description - Mind Over Mood

Mind Over Mood was written to help people suffering from mood disorders including depression, anxiety, anger, guilt and shame. It is a clear, concise guide that shows readers how the proven and powerful principles of cognitive therapy can improve their lives. The book is often recommended by psychotherapists to their clients and can serve as a guide to treatment for those involved in cognitive therapy. Mind Over Mood is also used as a self help book and, at times, is used as a text for psychiatrists and psychologists learning how to do cognitive therapy. Mind Over Mood was chosen for inclusion in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service’s Books On Prescription program. The Books On Prescription program is a selective list of self help books that primary care physicians and mental health specialists in Great Britain can “prescribe” for patients with mood disorders. Mind Over Mood was awarded the “Most Influential Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Book” by the prestigious British Association of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. Mind Over Mood is one of the best selling books on cognitive therapy. Over 1,000,000 copies have been sold in English and in the 19 other languages it has been translated into.

In 2009 Mind Over Mood was awarded the Book of Merit Award by the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Mind Over Mood was among the first books to receive this award. This award acknowledges self help books that achieve excellence in describing psychological strategies and methods that have been scientifically documented to alleviate psychological distress.

Mind Over Mood was recommended as an Educational Resource For Patients and Families by the American Journal of Psychiatry (February, 2009, Volume 166, Number 2, the Official Journal of the American Psychiatric Association.   This was a special edition of the Journal describing Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Panic Disorder.

Aaron T. Beck, M.D. the father of cognitive therapy said of Mind Over Mood "Never before have the nuts and bolts of cognitive therapy been spelled out so explicitly in a step by step fashion for the lay public".


Mind over Mood: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think  by Dennis Greenberger, Ph.D. and Christine Padesky, Ph.D. (Paperback)
Published by Guilford Press
Clinician's Guide to Mind over Mood by Christine Padesky, Ph.D. with Dennis Greenberger, Ph.D. (Paperback)
Published by Guilford Press

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Mind Over Mood Research

Ricahrdson, R., Richards, D., Barkham, M. (2010).
Self-Help Books for People with Depression: the Role of the Therapeutic Relationship.
Behavioral and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 38, 67-81.

Whitfield, G.,Williams, C., Shapiro, D. 
Assessing the take up and acceptability of the self-help room used by patients awaiting their initial outpatient appointment
Behavioral and Cognitive Psychotherapy (2001), 29: 333-343 Cambridge University Press


The concurrent validity of the mind over mood anxiety inventory

Teri Cox
University of Kentucky

Don Beal, Susan Brittain
Eastern Kentucky University

Introduction:

The availability of valid instruments to assess emotional problems is critical for systematically monitoring ongoing psychological treatment, demonstrating treatment efficacy, as well as for carrying out epidemiological research. The purpose of the present investigation was to further assess the concurrent validity of the Mind Over Mood Anxiety Inventory (MOM-A), (Greenberger & Padesky, 1995).

The MOM-A is a brief self report inventory developed to evaluate symptoms of anxiety (Greenberger & Padeski, 1995). The MOM-A consists of 24 items assessing three dimensions of anxiety: (1) anxious feelings; (2) anxious thoughts; and (3) physical symptoms. Clients are asked to indicate how much each of the 24 symptoms has bothered them in the "last week". A 4-point rating scale for each item indicates the severity of each symptom, from 0 ("not at all") to 3 ("most of the time"). The MOM-A yields an overall anxiety score ranging from 0 to 72, determined by summing the self-ratings across all items.

Method

One method of establishing the concurrent validity of a psychometric instrument is to correlate the instruments' scores with other well established, valid instruments that measure the same construct the new test purports to measure (Anastasi & Urbina, 1997). Thus in the present study, the scores from the MOM-A were correlated with scores from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Burns Anxiety Inventory (Burns-A).

Instruments: The Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Burns Anxiety Inventory were selected as reference standards, as both have good internal consistency, strong content validity, excellent concurrent validity, and clear discriminative validity. Thus given their well established empirical support, both are seen as valid, well established self report measures of anxiety.

Participants: Participants consisted of a group of 100 undergraduate students enrolled in Psychology courses at a regional university in the southeastern United States. Each participant was given the MOM-A, the Beck Anxiety Scale, and the Burn’s-A. The order of administration of these instruments was varied to avoid order effects. These scores were then analyzed to determine if there were significant correlations among the different measures of anxiety.

Results and Discussion

It was found that the MOM-A correlated significantly with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Burn’s-A in the analyses, (See Table 1).

In all cases the correlations were highly significant (p<.01), and positive. Thus, these findings provide encouraging supportive evidence for the concurrent validity of the Mind Over Mood Anxiety Inventory, (MOM-A).

References:

Greenberger D. and Padesky, C.A. (1995). Mind Over Mood: A Cognitive Therapy Treatment Manual for Clients. New York: Guilford Press.

Table 1.

Intercorrelations between the MOM-A, the BAI, and the Burn’s-A,.

  MOM - A Beck Anx. Inv Burn's - A
MOM - A
Beck Anx. Inv.
Burn's - A
1.00
.724
1.00
.849*
.773*
1.00

* Significant at the .01 level.

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The concurrent validity of the mind over mood depression inventory

Don Beal, Susan Brittain, Robert Brubaker, Steve Falkenberg
Eastern Kentucky University

Teri Cox
University of Kentucky

INTRODUCTION:

The availability of valid instruments to assess emotional problems is critical for systematically monitoring ongoing psychological treatment, demonstrating treatment efficacy, as well as for carrying out epidemiological research. The purpose of the present investigation was to further assess the concurrent validity of the Mind Over Mood Depression Inventory (MOM-D).

The MOM-D is a brief self report inventory developed to assess depression severity (Greenberger & Padesky, 1995). The MOM-D consists of nineteen items assessing four different dimensions of depression, (affect, cognitions, behavioral and physiological symptoms). Clients are asked to indicate how much each of the 19 symptoms has bothered them in the "last week". A 4-point rating scale for each item indicates the severity of each symptom, from 0 ("not at all") to 3 ("a lot"). The MOM-D yields an overall depression score ranging from 0 to 57, determined by summing the self-ratings across all items.

METHOD

One method of establishing the concurrent validity of a psychometric instrument is to correlate the instruments' scores with other well established, valid instruments that measure the same construct the new test purports to measure (Anastasi & Urbina, 1997). Thus in the present study, the scores from the MOM-D were correlated with scores from the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), and the Burns Depression Checklist (Burns-D).

Instruments: The Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Burns Depression Checklist (Burns-D) were selected as reference standards, as both have good internal consistency, strong content validity, excellent concurrent validity, and well established discriminative validity. Thus given their well established empirical support, both are seen as valid, well established self report measures of depression.

Participants: Participants consisted of a group of 104 undergraduate students enrolled in Psychology courses at a regional university in the southeastern United States. Each participant was given the MOM-D, the Beck Depression Scale (BDI-II) , and the Burn’s-D. The order of administration of these instruments was varied to avoid order effects. These scores were then analyzed to determine if there were significant correlations among the different measures of depression.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

It was found that the MOM-D correlated significantly and positively with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Burn’s Depression Checklist (See Table 1).

In all cases the correlations were highly significant (p<.01). Thus, these findings provide encouraging supportive evidence for the concurrent validity of the Mind Over Mood Depression Inventory.

Table 1

Intercorrelations between the MOM-D, the BDI-II, and the Burn’s-D.

  MOM - D Beck Dep. Inv - II Burn's - D
MOM - D
Beck Dep. Inv II
Burn's - D
1.00 .877*
1.00
.878*
.884*
1.00

*Significant at the .01 level.

Contact: Don Beal, Department of Psychology, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475. Phone (606) 622-1108; FAX (606) 622-5871. E-mail: don.beal@eku.edu.

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Translations of the Book

Looking for Mind Over Mood in a different language? Try this list of translations.

Arabic
Chinese
Chinese/Taiwanese
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Estonian
Farsi
French
Greek
Japanese

German - Amazon-de

German - Publisher's Web site

Hebrew
Italian
Indonesian
Korean
Lituanian
Polish
Portuguese
Spanish
Turkish

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